From Scary Mommy: “7 Things I Want You to Know About My Gifted Kid”

This posting contains a message from a mother who asks for greater understanding of her child by sharing seven things about gifted children.

by Maureen McDermid

As parents, not only do we find ourselves on a steep learning curve about our children, but we find we need to help others understand their delights and quirks.  We cannot count on finding general understanding of the many diverse ways children show their high potential/high ability and the challenges they face in interfacing with their world.  This posting contains a message from a mother who asks for greater understanding of her child by sharing seven things about gifted children that she hopes will create a more accepting and informed attitude for those that don’t have gifted children and some insight for those that are parenting one (or more).

http://www.scarymommy.com/know-about-gifted-children/

Anxiety and Adolescents – The Davidson Institute

This month the GCABC recommends articles on anxiety and adolescents from the Davidson Institute . 

by Debbie Clelland

The Davidson Institute is an organization that supports the education and sharing of information for gifted and profoundly gifted students and their families.  This organization has resources that I have found to be reliable, well-researched and wide-ranging. They include resources that teachers and parents often find very practical and helpful.

Learn more at http://www.davidsongifted.org/About-Us/Programs

They have many programs for young scholars (online and summer events), and a high school program at the University of Nevada, Reno. They also offer resources for parents, such as an online community, webinars, books and articles on many valuable topics.

The Davidson Institute also has an e-newsletter that includes recent resources or articles of interest to educators and parents.  This month we recommend their articles on anxiety and adolescents.  The links provided in the Davidson Institute newsletter are below.
Tips for Parents: Anxiety, Sensitivities and Social Struggles among Profoundly Gifted Kids

http://www.davidsongifted.org/Search-Database/entry/A10750
Tips for Parents: Adolescence and the HG/PG Individual

http://www.davidsongifted.org/Search-Database/entry/A10372


From Edutopia: 15 Questions to Replace “How Was School Today?”

How can you get your kids to talk about what happened in school? Find out here.

By Maureen McDermid

Each day we send our children off to school and trust that they will have learned something of interest, been intrigued by something they heard, had an experience that gave them insight or just plain had a good day! The question for us as parents is, how can we find out about our children’s’ perceptions of their day if they don’t rush in the door shouting, “guess what we did today” or dominate the dinner table conversation with a run down of the day’s events?

If you are like my family, it is rare that the above event occurs, but I’d really like to have it happen more often. One thing I have learned is that asking the question, “What did you do today?” rarely elicits much response. As a result, I look for different ways to ask the question and found this post from an educational organization, Edutopia, that gave me some better alternatives. As an educator, I often visit this website and have found it helpful in many ways. So, have a read, try this out, and see what you can shake loose from your children!
https://www.edutopia.org/blog/parents-fifteen-questions-replace-how-was-school-today-elena-aguilar?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=cpc

About SENG

Debbie Clelland recommends membership in the organisation Supporting the Emotional Needs of the Gifted (SENG).

By Debbie Clelland

This month we are sending you some information about one of my favourite resources for parents of gifted children:  the organization Supporting the Emotional Needs of the Gifted (SENG).

This organization is based in the US, but has a lot of very relevant and useful information for parents in Canada as well.  They focus on the social and emotional aspects of giftedness, and their founders have a psychology background so the they offer a different perspective than many of the education-based organizations.

SENG does some great work in the gifted community, including:

* webinars offered by experts in the field of giftedness

* summer conference that includes a children’s program

* training facilitators of parent groups

* lots of resources on their website, including articles

http://sengifted.org/

One of my favourite articles is one that really helps parents understand overexcitabilities, and is written in a way that is easy to see how they play out in the classroom as well.  And, rather than just telling what overexcitabilities are, there are some “strategies” offered that I have found very helpful.  Sharon Lind is the author.  It starts:

Overexcitability and the Gifted

by Sharon Lind

A small amount of definitive research and a great deal of naturalistic observation have led to the belief that intensity, sensitivity and overexcitability are primary characteristics of the highly gifted. These observations are supported by parents and teachers who notice distinct behavioral and constitutional differences between highly gifted children and their peers.

The rest of the article is found at: http://sengifted.org/overexcitability-and-the-gifted/