Dr. James Webb is My Hero – Don’t miss seeing him in Canada!

By Debbie Clelland, Past-President of the Gifted Children’s Association of BC

As a parent of two gifted sons, I have been very fortunate over the years to be inspired and consoled by the resources created by Dr. James Webb.  That is why I am ecstatic that he is joining us here in Vancouver in April as a speaker for parents, educators and health care professionals! Since I realized that some of you may not really know about him, I wanted to jump up and down a bit about how rare and important an opportunity it is to hear him speak.

Back in 2003 when our oldest son was assessed as gifted, my partner and I turned to each other and said, “OK, now what?”  There were two things that really helped us: the GCABC and the resources created by James Webb.  We got a VHS tape out of our library of James Webb presenting to a group of parents about understanding giftedness, and then watched it several times.  It helped us see we were “normal” gifted parents experiencing “normal” things with our family. That was a huge relief, and so needed for us and our family to make sense of re-interpreting our experience over the previous 9 years with our sons.

James Webb (Jim) is a great humanitarian on a mission to help parents of gifted children, educators and mental health professionals understand giftedness and its many nuances.  When he discovered that parents and psychologists were struggling to understand the social-emotional aspects of giftedness, he created the organization Supporting the Emotional Needs of the Gifted (SENG). Within SENG, he developed a way to train parents to lead support groups for other parents and created a new publishing house to get books out there as a support for gifted families. He even ended up writing several books on unique things like grand-parenting gifted children and the sometimes world weary existential depression experienced by some gifted people

I have had the pleasure of seeing Jim present at a few SENG summer conferences in various locations around the US, and have always found him to be an engaging speaker who really “gets it”. He speaks to the people in the room in a way that conveys his many years of learning as if we are sitting down at the kitchen table together to have a chat about these gifted folks we all care so much about.

I was over the moon when I learned that our own Maureen McDermid invited Jim to join us in Canada and that he accepted.  To my knowledge, this is the first time he has presented in our country.  I can’t say enough about how big a deal this is – come and join us!


Still not registered for the conference Power Up Potential 2018 with Dr. James Webb, and a number of other experts on giftedness? Sign up on the conference website before March 1 to take advantage of the Early Bird rate. 

<< Register for Power Up Potential Here!

Website for Power Up Potential 2018 is launched

The website for the conference “Power Up Potential 2018” has been launched and the registration process is open for anyone who want to attend this exciting and interesting conference. The conference is organised by the GCABC in a joint effort with the Lower Mainland Gifted Contacts – a teacher network for teachers all working with gifted education.

Feature lecturer is Dr. James Webb, more known as  the psychologist who initiated the organisation Supporting the Emotional Needs of the Gifted – SENG.

There will be four events during the three-day conference:

  • Event 1 – Thursday April 5, 2018, 9:00AM-11:30AM “Twelve Key Concerns of Parents of Gifted Children that Educators should know about”. With Featured Speaker Dr. James Webb. Target audience: Educational Leaders.
  • Event 2 – Thursday April 5, 2018, 4:00PM-8:00PM. “Motivation and Underachievement”. With Featured Speaker Dr. James Webb. Target audience: Teachers.
  • Event 3 – Friday, April 6, 2018, 9:00AM-11:30AM.  “Misdiagnoses and Dual Diagnoses of Gifted Children”. With Featured Speaker Dr. James Webb. Target audience: Health Care & Counselor Professionals.
  • Event 4 – Saturday, April 7, 2018, 9:00AM-3:00PM. “Power Up Potential 2018”. With Featured Speaker Dr. James Webb as well as 12 other experts on different aspects of gifted children. Target audience: Parents and other adult family members.

Please note that tickets are limited and are expected to sell out fast. Get your ticket today and experience the newest and hottest information on giftedness in BC!

Priorities of the GCABC 2017-2018

The new GCABC board, elected in May 2017, has this far already had two board meetings, as well as created a preliminary work schedule for 2017-2018.

Currently, the board is busy deciding on what activities should be prioritized. Among the planned activities are conferences, workshops and advocacy work. We would like to start the work by asking for YOUR feedback on what the priorities should be for the GCABC this coming year.

What matter is the most important and pressing one for gifted children in BC?

From Scary Mommy: “7 Things I Want You to Know About My Gifted Kid”

This posting contains a message from a mother who asks for greater understanding of her child by sharing seven things about gifted children.

by Maureen McDermid

As parents, not only do we find ourselves on a steep learning curve about our children, but we find we need to help others understand their delights and quirks.  We cannot count on finding general understanding of the many diverse ways children show their high potential/high ability and the challenges they face in interfacing with their world.  This posting contains a message from a mother who asks for greater understanding of her child by sharing seven things about gifted children that she hopes will create a more accepting and informed attitude for those that don’t have gifted children and some insight for those that are parenting one (or more).

http://www.scarymommy.com/know-about-gifted-children/

Anxiety and Adolescents – The Davidson Institute

This month the GCABC recommends articles on anxiety and adolescents from the Davidson Institute . 

by Debbie Clelland

The Davidson Institute is an organization that supports the education and sharing of information for gifted and profoundly gifted students and their families.  This organization has resources that I have found to be reliable, well-researched and wide-ranging. They include resources that teachers and parents often find very practical and helpful.

Learn more at http://www.davidsongifted.org/About-Us/Programs

They have many programs for young scholars (online and summer events), and a high school program at the University of Nevada, Reno. They also offer resources for parents, such as an online community, webinars, books and articles on many valuable topics.

The Davidson Institute also has an e-newsletter that includes recent resources or articles of interest to educators and parents.  This month we recommend their articles on anxiety and adolescents.  The links provided in the Davidson Institute newsletter are below.
Tips for Parents: Anxiety, Sensitivities and Social Struggles among Profoundly Gifted Kids

http://www.davidsongifted.org/Search-Database/entry/A10750
Tips for Parents: Adolescence and the HG/PG Individual

http://www.davidsongifted.org/Search-Database/entry/A10372


BC’s New Curriculum

Maureen McDermid presents the new BC curriculum.

By Maureen McDermid

The new BC curriculum, what’s in it for gifted learners, their teachers and families?
When considering the new curriculum with respect to gifted learners, it’s fair to ask, “What’s in it for these learners?” and “What’s in it for us as their teachers and parents?”.

Continue reading “BC’s New Curriculum”

From Edutopia: 15 Questions to Replace “How Was School Today?”

How can you get your kids to talk about what happened in school? Find out here.

By Maureen McDermid

Each day we send our children off to school and trust that they will have learned something of interest, been intrigued by something they heard, had an experience that gave them insight or just plain had a good day! The question for us as parents is, how can we find out about our children’s’ perceptions of their day if they don’t rush in the door shouting, “guess what we did today” or dominate the dinner table conversation with a run down of the day’s events?

If you are like my family, it is rare that the above event occurs, but I’d really like to have it happen more often. One thing I have learned is that asking the question, “What did you do today?” rarely elicits much response. As a result, I look for different ways to ask the question and found this post from an educational organization, Edutopia, that gave me some better alternatives. As an educator, I often visit this website and have found it helpful in many ways. So, have a read, try this out, and see what you can shake loose from your children!
https://www.edutopia.org/blog/parents-fifteen-questions-replace-how-was-school-today-elena-aguilar?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=cpc